​To register as an organ donor, complete and submit the form on this page

OR

Print and complete the PDF form 

 

and email it to 

contact@CommunityHealthCoalition.com 

or mail it to

Community Health Coalition

PO Box 15176

Durham, NC 27704

Learn more:

CHC Organ Donation Brochure >

Donate Life NC >

Organ & Tissue Donor Registration

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Should it be determined that the authorized gifts are unsuitable for transplantation, I give consent for those gifts to be used for medical research/education purposes.

I hereby give authorization to release any information and reports pertaining to the evaluation, use and follow-up of my donated organs, eyes, and/or tissue to authorized personnel in order to determine the medical suitability and safety of these gifts. This information includes hospital records and post mortem reports. Under the NC Uniform Anatomical Gift Act (Session Law 2007-538), an anatomical gift not revoked by the donor before death is irrevocable and does not require authorization or concurrence of any person after the donor's death. The law also authorizes any examination necessary to assure the medical acceptability of the anatomical gift. 

In order to comply with my wishes, representatives from all organ, eye, and tissue procurement entities serving NC are authorized to review copies of medical records, test for hepatitis, HIV, syphilis, and conduct any other examination to determine the medical suitability of the anatomical gift.

 

A different location may be needed to carry out the recovery of donated organs, eyes and tissues. In that case, my body may be transferred to an alternative surgical facility such as a nearby hospital or surgery suite for the recovery of organs, eyes and tissues. 

 

I may also indicate my authorization to be a donor by having a heart placed on my license at the NC Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV) but this is a separate registration process. If I wish to change or revoke this donation authorization, I will need to do so through the Donate Life NC website at DonateLifeNC.org.

Thank you! We received your registration.

Myths & Realities About Becoming an Organ Donor

Myth

If I agree to donate my organs, my doctor or the emergency room staff won’t work as hard to save my life. They’ll remove my organs as soon as possible to save somebody else.

Reality
When you go to the hospital for treatment, doctors focus on saving your life. You’re seen by a doctor whose specialty most closely matches your particular emergency. The doctor in charge of your care has nothing to do with transplantation.

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Myth

​Organ donation is against my religion.

Reality

Organ donation is consistent with the beliefs of most religions. If you are unsure or uncomfortable with your faith’s position on donation, ask a member of your clergy. You may also check the Carolina Donor Services web site www.carolinadonorservices.org for religious views on organ donation.

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Myth

I’m under age 18. I’m too young to make the decision.

Reality
Individuals can make a legal decision to register as a donor once they are 16, but parents/guardians of minors under 18 years of age are consulted before donation occurs.

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Myth

I want my loved ones to have an open-casket funeral. That can’t happen if his or her organs or tissues have been donated.

Reality
Organ and tissues donation doesn’t interfere with having an open-casket funeral. The donor’s body is clothed for burial, so there are not visible signs of organ or tissue donation.

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Myth

I’m too old to donate. Nobody would want my organs.

Reality
There’s no defined cutoff age for organ donation. The decision to use your organs is based on strict medical criteria, not age. Organs have been successfully transplanted from donors in their 70s and 80s.

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Myth

Rich, famous and powerful people always seem to move to the front of the line when they need a donor organ. There’s no way to ensure that my organs will go to those who’ve waited the longest or the neediest.

Reality
The rich and famous aren’t given priority when it comes to allocation of organs. It may seem that way because of the amount of publicity generated when celebrities receive a transplant. The United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) is responsible for maintaining the national organ transplant waiting list and subjects all celebrity transplants to an internal audit to make sure the organ allocation was appropriate.

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Myth

My family will be charged if I donate my organs.

Reality
The organ donor’s family is never charged for donating. The family is charged for the cost of all final efforts to save your life and those costs are sometimes misinterpreted as costs related to organ donation. Costs for organ recovery go to the transplant recipient.

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Myth

I have a medical condition, so I can't be a donor. 

Reality
Anyone, regardless of age or medical history, can sign up to be a donor. The transplant team will determine at an individual's time of death whether donation is possible. You should still consider registering. Even with an illness, you may be able to donate your organs or tissues. 

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Myth

People in the LGBT community can't donate.

Reality
There is no policy or federal regulation that excludes a member of the LGBT community from donating organs. What matters in donating organs is the health of the organs.